Anglų - Lietuvių žodynas

Kompiuterinis žodynas internete nemokamai

get

Anglų lietuvių žodynas. Žodis get reiškia (got; amer. pp t. p. gotten) v 1) gauti; turėti (nuosavą) he has got a car jis turi (nuosavą) automobilį; 2) pasiekti, atvykti; 3) priversti, įtikinti; 4) ateiti; to get home ateiti, pareiti namo; pasiekti namus; 5) tapti; it is getting darktemsta; to get lietuviškai.

Get tarimas:

  • /get/

Get audio:

Žodžio paaiškinimas anglų kalba:

  • verb-transitive: To come into possession or use of; receive: got a cat for her birthday.
  • verb-transitive: To meet with or incur: got nothing but trouble for her efforts.
  • verb-transitive: To go after and obtain: got a book at the library; got breakfast in town.
  • verb-transitive: To go after and bring: Get me a pillow.
  • verb-transitive: To purchase; buy: get groceries.
  • verb-transitive: To acquire as a result of action or effort: He got his information from the Internet. You can't get water out of a stone.
  • verb-transitive: To earn: got high marks in math.
  • verb-transitive: To accomplish or attain as a result of military action.
  • verb-transitive: To obtain by concession or request: couldn't get the time off; got permission to go.
  • verb-transitive: To arrive at; reach: When did you get home?
  • verb-transitive: To reach and board; catch: She got her plane two minutes before takeoff.
  • verb-transitive: To succeed in communicating with, as by telephone: can't get me at the office until nine.
  • verb-transitive: To become affected with (an illness, for example) by infection or exposure; catch: get the flu; got the mumps.
  • verb-transitive: To be subjected to; undergo: got a severe concussion.
  • verb-transitive: To receive as retribution or punishment: got six years in prison for tax fraud.
  • verb-transitive: To sustain a stated injury to: got my arm broken.
  • verb-transitive: To gain or have understanding of: Do you get this question?
  • verb-transitive: To learn (a poem, for example) by heart; memorize.
  • verb-transitive: To find or reach by calculating: get a total; can't get the answer.
  • verb-transitive: To perceive by hearing: I didn't get your name when we were introduced.
  • verb-transitive: To procreate; beget.
  • verb-transitive: To cause to become or be in a specified state or condition: got the children tired and cross; got the shirt clean.
  • verb-transitive: To make ready; prepare: get lunch for a crowd.
  • verb-transitive: To cause to come or go: got the car through traffic.
  • verb-transitive: To cause to move or leave: Get me out of here!
  • verb-transitive: To cause to undertake or perform; prevail on: got the guide to give us the complete tour.
  • verb-transitive: To take, especially by force; seize: The detective got the suspect as he left the restaurant.
  • verb-transitive: Informal To overcome or destroy: The ice storm got the rose bushes.
  • verb-transitive: To evoke an emotional response or reaction in: Romantic music really gets me.
  • verb-transitive: To annoy or irritate: What got me was his utter lack of initiative.
  • verb-transitive: To present a difficult problem to; puzzle.
  • verb-transitive: To take revenge on, especially to kill in revenge for a wrong.
  • verb-transitive: Informal To hit or strike: She got him on the chin. The bullet got him in the arm.
  • verb-transitive: Baseball To put out.
  • verb-transitive: To begin or start. Used with the present participle: I have to get working on this or I'll miss my deadline.
  • verb-transitive: To have current possession of. Used in the present perfect form with the meaning of the present: We've got plenty of cash.
  • verb-transitive: Nonstandard To have current possession of. Used in the past tense form with the meaning of the present: They got a nice house in town.
  • verb-transitive: To have as an obligation. Used in the present perfect form with the meaning of the present: I have got to leave early. You've got to do the dishes.
  • verb-transitive: Nonstandard To have as an obligation. Used in the past tense with the meaning of the present: I got to git me a huntin' dog.
  • verb-intransitive: To become or grow to be: eventually got well.
  • verb-intransitive: To be successful in coming or going: When will we get to Dallas?
  • verb-intransitive: To be able or permitted: never got to see Europe; finally got to work at home.
  • verb-intransitive: To be successful in becoming: get free of a drug problem.
  • verb-intransitive: Used with the past participle of transitive verbs as a passive voice auxiliary: got stung by a bee.
  • verb-intransitive: To become drawn in, entangled, or involved: got into debt; get into a hassle.
  • verb-intransitive: Informal To depart immediately: yelled at the dog to get.
  • verb-intransitive: To work for gain or profit; make money: puts all his energy into getting and spending.
  • noun: The act of begetting.
  • noun: Progeny; offspring.
  • noun: Chiefly British Slang A foolish or contemptible person.
  • noun: Sports A return, as in tennis, on a shot that seems impossible to reach.
  • phrasal-verb: get about To be out of bed and beginning to walk again, as after an illness.
  • phrasal-verb: get across To make understandable or clear: tried to get my point across.
  • phrasal-verb: get across To be convincing or understandable: How can I get across to the students?
  • phrasal-verb: get after To urge or scold: You should get after them to mow the lawn.
  • phrasal-verb: get along To be or continue to be on harmonious terms: gets along with the in-laws.
  • phrasal-verb: get along To manage or fare with reasonable success: can't get along on those wages.
  • phrasal-verb: get along To make progress.
  • phrasal-verb: get along To advance, especially in years.
  • phrasal-verb: get along To go away; leave.
  • phrasal-verb: get around To circumvent or evade: managed to get around the real issues.
  • phrasal-verb: get around Informal To convince or win over by flattering or cajoling.
  • phrasal-verb: get around To travel from place to place: It is hard to get around without a car.
  • phrasal-verb: get around To become known; circulate: Word got around.
  • phrasal-verb: get at To touch or reach successfully: The cat hid where we couldn't get at it.
  • phrasal-verb: get at To try to make understandable; hint at or suggest: I don't know what you're getting at.
  • phrasal-verb: get at To discover or understand: tried to get at the cause of the problem.
  • phrasal-verb: get at Informal To bribe or influence by improper or illegal means: He got at the judge, and the charges were dismissed.
  • phrasal-verb: get away To break free; escape.
  • phrasal-verb: get away To leave or go away: wanted to come along, but couldn't get away.
  • phrasal-verb: get back To return to a person, place, or condition: getting back to the subject.
  • phrasal-verb: get by To pass or outstrip.
  • phrasal-verb: get by To succeed at a level of minimal acceptibility or with the minimal amount of effort: just got by in college.
  • phrasal-verb: get by To succeed in managing; survive: We'll get by if we economize.
  • phrasal-verb: get by To be unnoticed or ignored by: The mistake got by the editor, but the proofreader caught it.
  • phrasal-verb: get down To descend.
  • phrasal-verb: get down To give one's attention. Often used with to: Let's get down to work.
  • phrasal-verb: get down To exhaust, discourage, or depress: The heat was getting me down.
  • phrasal-verb: get down To swallow: got the pill down on the first try.
  • phrasal-verb: get down To describe in writing.
  • phrasal-verb: get down Informal To lose one's inhibitions; enjoy oneself wholeheartedly.
  • phrasal-verb: get in To enter.
  • phrasal-verb: get in To arrive: We got in late last night.
  • phrasal-verb: get in To become or cause to become involved: She got in with the wrong crowd. Repeated loans from the finance company got me deeper in debt.
  • phrasal-verb: get in To become accepted, as in a club.
  • phrasal-verb: get in To succeed in making or doing: got in six deliveries before noon.
  • phrasal-verb: get into To become involved in: got into trouble by stealing cars.
  • phrasal-verb: get into Informal To be interested in: got into gourmet cooking.
  • phrasal-verb: get off To start, as on a trip; leave.
  • phrasal-verb: get off To fire (a round of ammunition, for example): got off two shots before the deer disappeared.
  • phrasal-verb: get off To write and send, as a letter.
  • phrasal-verb: get off To escape, as from punishment or danger: got off scot-free.
  • phrasal-verb: get off To obtain a release or lesser penalty for: The attorney got her client off with a slap on the wrist.
  • phrasal-verb: get off Slang To act or speak with effrontery. Used in the imperative to express contempt or disdainful disbelief.
  • phrasal-verb: get off Slang To have an orgasm.
  • phrasal-verb: get off To feel great pleasure or gratification.
  • phrasal-verb: get off To experience euphoria, for example, as a result of taking a drug.
  • phrasal-verb: get off To get permission to leave one's workplace: got off early and went fishing.
  • phrasal-verb: get on To be or continue on harmonious terms: gets on well with the neighbors.
  • phrasal-verb: get on To manage or fare with reasonable success.
  • phrasal-verb: get on To make progress; continue: get on with a performance.
  • phrasal-verb: get on To advance in years.
  • phrasal-verb: get on To acquire understanding or knowledge: got on to the con game.
  • phrasal-verb: get out To leave or escape.
  • phrasal-verb: get out To cause to leave or escape.
  • phrasal-verb: get out To become known: Somehow the secret got out.
  • phrasal-verb: get out To publish, as a newspaper.
  • phrasal-verb: get over To prevail against; overcome.
  • phrasal-verb: get over To recover from: finally got over the divorce.
  • phrasal-verb: get over To get across.
  • phrasal-verb: get through To arrive at the end of; finish or complete.
  • phrasal-verb: get through To succeed in making contact; reach.
  • phrasal-verb: get through To make oneself understood.
  • phrasal-verb: get to To begin. Used with the present participle: got to reminiscing.
  • phrasal-verb: get to To start to deal with: didn't get to the housework until Sunday.
  • phrasal-verb: get to To influence or affect, especially adversely: The noise really gets to me.
  • phrasal-verb: get together To bring together; gather.
  • phrasal-verb: get together To come together.
  • phrasal-verb: get together To arrive at an agreement.
  • phrasal-verb: get up To arise from bed or rise to one's feet.
  • phrasal-verb: get up To climb.
  • phrasal-verb: get up To act as the creator or organizer of: got up a petition against rezoning.
  • phrasal-verb: get up To dress or adorn: She got herself up in a bizarre outfit.
  • phrasal-verb: get up To find within oneself: got up the nerve to quit.
  • idiom: get around to To find the time or occasion for.
  • idiom: get away with To escape the consequences of (a blameworthy act, for example): got away with cheating.
  • idiom: get back at To take revenge on.
  • idiom: get cracking To begin to work; get started.
  • idiom: get even To obtain revenge.
  • idiom: get even with To repay with an equivalent act, as for revenge.
  • idiom: get going To make a beginning; get started.
  • idiom: hold To bring into one's grasp, possession, or control.
  • idiom: hold To communicate with, especially by telephone.
  • idiom: get it Informal To be punished or scolded.
  • idiom: get it on Slang To become filled with energy or excitement.
  • idiom: get it on Slang To engage in sexual intercourse.
  • idiom: get nowhere To make no progress.
  • idiom: get (one's) Informal To receive one's due punishment: After sassing his parents, he really got his.
  • idiom: get on the stick To begin to work.
  • idiom: get out of To gain release from the obligation of: She tried to get out of taking her brother to the mall. He couldn't get out of his date on Saturday.
  • idiom: get (someone's) goat To make angry or vexed.
  • idiom: get somewhere Informal To make progress.
  • idiom: get there Informal To make progress or achieve success.
  • idiom: get wind of To learn of: got wind of the scheme.


Lietuviškos reikšmės:

  • turėti (nuosavą) he has got a car jis turi (nuosavą) automobilį
  • ateiti
  • pasiekti namus
  • tapti
  • it is getting darktemsta
  • to get
  • pp t. p. gotten) v
  • gauti
  • pasiekti
  • atvykti
  • priversti
  • įtikinti
  • to get home ateiti
  • pareiti namo
Žodyno testas

Ką reiškia lietuviškai?

Parinkite teisingą atsakymą

about

/ə'baut/
Anglų lietuvių žodynas. Ką reiškia žodis about lietuviškai?

--Autorius (flickr)

Atversti kitą žodį